The Fringe of Cairo and Suez: Living Differently In Different Places (Egypt)

I started this page without an intention of pushing an ideological perspective, but I don’t want to avoid talking about what it means to live life to it’s fullest whether “here” or “there”. I just returned from a trip to Cairo, Egypt, and I saw people who lived very differently from one another while I was there. I had the chance to meet the Pope of Coptic Church, as well as people who have had their churches burned. I also had the chance to meet some of the people from Zabbaleen (which means garbage people), who live in a literal city off the side of Cairo as the waste management system for the greater city of Cairo. Before I went to Egypt my understanding was the people in Egypt were pretty much just all Muslim, and I might as well have assumed that they were all “radical”, and hated Christians. Well, not everyone in Egypt is a Muslim, and the vast majority of them are very tolerant of Christians! The tolerance statement I can mostly speak for in the city of Cairo, as most metropolitan areas require some copacetic social structures by the people. Life in Egypt was far more diverse than I would’ve expected… We had the chance to see what it looked like when extremism poked it’s head out in Cairo and Suez – the majority of people were infuriated by the burning of churches.

I decided that since I started this website to talk about how to live intentionally, even though much of that is based in my knowledge of Real Estate, I think it’s important that we talk about how we can live intentionally with what we already have – I have to work on this everyday.

If you’d like to watch the 60 Minutes segment about the Coptic Church that was made after the churches were burned in 2013 here it is:

Below is a picture that I posted on Instagram to quickly sum up my trip, but I plan to post a little bit more about this in the future. Thank you for reading, and I always love feedback.

I'm Home!!! For the last week I've been in Egypt connecting with people of all stripes. Thanks to my buddy Gavin, I was able to meet the Coptic Pope (look up the 60 minutes segment on the Coptic Church if you have a few minutes), meet with church groups whose churches were burned down in Suez, and connect with people in Zabbaleen (the trash city of Cairo). Each of these experiences was enormously impactful, but seeing the resilience of a group of people who were violently attacked and seem to move forward with grace was unbelievable. They lived everyday intentionally. And to also see a group of people whose livelihood is to live amongst, and work in trash sorting really called me to change how I approach what I classify as a necessity, rather than a want. I love being able to work with people to find homes to live in, I only wish that each time before we started the process that we could have dinner with the people of Zabbaleen, or a church group from Suez to better sort our priorities and goals. What if we could find ways in our own lives to make our homes more welcoming to those in need? I found that the Pope, the people of Zabbaleen and Suez, and myself all spoke a common language – we all understood an ear to ear smile and a belly laugh. Have a good day my friends, and don't forget to smile – someone probably needs that beautiful smile 🙂

A post shared by Grady Carter – Home Boy OK (@homeboyok) on

I’m Home!!! For the last week I’ve been in Egypt connecting with people of all stripes. Thanks to my buddy Gavin, I was able to meet the Coptic Pope (look up the 60 minutes segment on the Coptic Church if you have a few minutes), meet with church groups whose churches were burned down in Suez, and connect with people in Zabbaleen (the trash city of Cairo). Each of these experiences was enormously impactful, but seeing the resilience of a group of people who were violently attacked and seem to move forward with grace was unbelievable. They lived everyday intentionally. And to also see a group of people whose livelihood is to live amongst, and work in trash sorting really called me to change how I approach what I classify as a necessity, rather than a want. I love being able to work with people to find homes to live in, I only wish that each time before we started the process that we could have dinner with the people of Zabbaleen, or a church group from Suez to better sort our priorities and goals. What if we could find ways in our own lives to make our homes more welcoming to those in need? I found that the Pope, the people of Zabbaleen and Suez, and myself all spoke a common language – we all understood an ear to ear smile and a belly laugh. Have a good day my friends, and don’t forget to smile – someone probably needs that beautiful smile 🙂

One thought on “The Fringe of Cairo and Suez: Living Differently In Different Places (Egypt)”

Leave a Reply